Poker

Draw Poker Variants

This class of games includes all games in which players receive their full complement of cards at the initial deal, then exchange some of them during the course of play.

5 Card Draw

Players: 3-7.

Initial deal: 5 cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: There is a betting round after the deal. After the betting round, each player may exchange up to three cards. Another round of betting ensues, followed by the showdown. With fewer than six players, a player may draw four cards if they show that their remaining card is an Ace.

Winner: High hand

Standard variations: Adding wild cards to play (and allowing five-of-a-kinds if chosen). 
High/low: the highest hand and lowest hand split the pot. 
Lowball: Lowest hand wins. 
Allowing for four card draw with an ace. 
Double Draw: After the first exchange and subsequent betting, there is another exchange and betting round.

All For One or One For All

Players: 3-10.

Initial deal: 5 cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: There is a round of betting. Each player, starting to the dealer’s left and continuing clockwise, may choose to either draw one more card or trade in all his cards for an equal number of replacements. Rounds of betting and drawing/exchanging continue, the leader rotating each time, until there are fewer cards in the deck than players left in the game.

Winner: High hand.

Anaconda

Players: 4-7.

Initial deal: 7 cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: Each player passes three cards to the player on their left after the first round of betting. After the next betting round, each player passes two cards to the player on their left. After another betting round, each player passes one card to the player on their left. Each player then chooses five cards to keep and discards the remaining two. Each player who chooses to remain in the hand places their 5-card hand face down in front of them. Play continues with a roll and a betting round until each player has rolled four cards, after which time a showdown ensues. The cards speak for themselves.

Winner: The high and low hands split the pot.

Standard variations: 1: The cards are passed to the player on the right. 
2: Each player keeps all seven cards after the passing and chooses among all seven cards to turn up. This allows the player to more easily change from high to low depending on what is being played (or to declare both).

DogButt

Players: 3-7

Initial deal: Same as 5-card draw.

Play: Same as 5-card draw, except, as in Baseball: 3’s & 9’s are wild. A 4 gets a player an extra card.

Winner: High hand.

Don Juan

Players: 3-8.

Initial deal: Three cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: There is a betting round. Each player in turn beginning at the left of the dealer may discard from 0-3 of their cards and draw replacements from the deck. There is a betting round. There is the showdown.

Winner: Low hand (A-2-3 is lowest).

Standard variations: Players pay a set amount, such as a dime, for each card replaced in leiu of the first betting round. After the draw, players proceed to play their three cards as in 3-card guts, either staying in or dropping depending on the degree of confidence each has in his hand. The remaining players have a showdown for the pot or the privilege of mathcing the pot or pot match limit. Play continues until only one player stays, as in guts.

Howdy Doody

Players: 4-7.

Initial deal: 7 cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: Same as Anaconda, with these exceptions: Threes are wild if and only if the hand they are in is used to try to win the high hand. Kings are wild if and only if the hand they are in is used to try for the low hand. There are no betting rounds until the showdown.

Winner: High and low hands split the pot.

Notes: The low pot is usually won by a perfect low. High is usually won by at least a full house.

Jacks to Open, Trips to Win

Players: 3-7.

Initial deal: 5 cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: Played like 5-card draw, with the following differences: Only a player with a hand as good as or better than a pair of Jacks may open the betting. If someone has such a hand, they may open the betting. If nobody can open, the hand is discarded, everyone antes again, and hands are redealt. Once the betting is opened, play continues as in 5 Card Draw until the showdown. At this time, anyone who has 3 of a kind or better is eligible to win the pot. The best eligible hand takes the pot. If nobody has an eligible hand (that is, nobody has at least 3 of a kind), then the hand is discarded, everyone antes again, and hands are redealt only to those players who have not folded this hand or a previous hand. If, on any given hand (regardless of eligibility), all but one player folds his hand, then the surviving player wins the pot, thus ending the game.

Winner: High hands wins the pot.

Standard variations: Progressive: If nobody can open, the requirement increases to a pair of Queens, then Kings, then Aces, then goes back to Jacks, etc. 
No Trips: Just play with Jacks-to-Open, but only openers to win. 
High-Low Split: The high hand and the Low hand split the pot. 
Limit Number of Hands: Set a number of hands (like five) to play regularly. If nobody wins after that many hands, then play 5-card draw normally, anything (guts) to open and anything (guts) to win.

Monkey Love

Players: 3-6

Initial deal: As in 5-card draw.

Play: Players declare how many cards they want to draw simultaneously. The player to your left gets the cards you discarded.

Neuticles

Players: 4-7

Initial deal: 7 cards to each player.

Play: This is essentually Anaconda with no passing of cards. Each player chooses their best 5-card High or Low hand from the cards they were dealt. Four cards are rolled with a betting round before the first roll and after each roll. There is a showdown after the last (fourth) roll and subsequent round of betting.

Winner: High and low hands split the pot.

Standard variations: Large Neuticles: 7 cards dealt to each player. 
Medium Neuticles: 6 cards dealt to each player. 
Small Neuticles: 5 cards dealt to each player.

Pick a Partner

Players: 4, 6, 8, or 10.

Initial deal: 5 cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: Everyone rolls a card. Highest card showing picks one of the other hands as a partner. The next highest unpartnered hand chooses a partner, and so forth until everyone is paired up. Each partnership combines their remaining 8 cards and chooses 3 of them. Three rounds of betting follow, with one of the 3 cards rolled after each round. The winning team splits the pot. If one member of a team folds, the other can continue playing and, if he wins, he wins the entire pot.

Winner: High hand.

Threes

Players: 3-5.

Initial deal: Five cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: Similar to 5-card draw, except there are three drawing rounds with betting rounds betting rounds before, between and after. The player is allowed to draw up to three cards per round (no four cards with an ace). Threes are wild.

Winner: High hand.

Strategy: Don’t throw away threes.

Trees

Players: 3-10.

Initial deal: 5 cards are dealt down to each player.

Play: There is a round of betting. Each player can now trade cards freely with every other player. Any number of cards can be exchanged, but a player must give the same number of cards he is receiving. When all no more trades are forthcoming, there is a final round of betting, then a showdown.

Winner: High hand wins the pot.

Triple Draw 2-7

Players: 2-6

Initial deal: Deal 5 cards to each player, as in 5 card draw.

Play: Each player is dealt 5 cards and the goal is to make the lowest possible 5 card hand. There are four rounds of betting and three draws in this game. After each round of betting, players choose cards to discard … anywhere from 0 to 5 … and the dealer deals them replacement cards. After the third and final draw, there is one last round of betting. A dealer button determines the order of betting and discarding.

Winner: Players try to make the lowest possible 5 card hand. Aces play for high only and deuces play for low. Because you are trying to make the lowest possible hand, straights and flushes count against you. This means that 23456, for example, is a very bad hand. It is not considered a 6-low. It is a straight and is therefore worse than holding AKQJ9. The best hand is 23457 unsuited.

Poker

PARTY POKER casino review

SoftwareWhy to play
Minimum System Requirements:Windows 95, 98, NT4, 2000, ME or XPPentium system with at least 32MB of RAMDownload size: Approx 3.1MB
Bonus infoChoose one of two bonus plans of PartyPoker:
Download to get 20% up to $100 Extra on FirstDeposit
Download, deposit $25 and receive a 100%deposit bonus. You get $50 for a $25 deposit
$5,000 New player freerollOne of the largest, most user friendly poker rooms on the internetGreat deposit bonusRegular “reload” bonusesHuge bad beat jackpots on dedicated tablesThe Party Poker Million tournament24 hours supportNote taking and Find Buddys options

Promotions

This month
– Easter Bonanza. The top 150 real money players, playing in raked hands, from March 24th until March 28th, playing between 3pm and 12am will win a cash bonus of up to $200. The pay scale is as follows: 
1st – 20th = $200 bonus 
21st – 50th = $100 bonus 
51st – 150th = $50 
Players can check their current standing and number of raked hands via the Party Poker website 

– The PartyPoker.com World Open. Daily satellites are running throughout March for this televised event. Qualifiers for the main event win a $14,000 buy-in, a 9 night stay at an exclusive hotel (for 2 people) and $1,200 spending/expenses money. The prize fund for this event is a guaranteed $1,000,000. 

On going promotions:
– Get 20% up to $100 Extra on First Deposit or deposit $25 and get $25 free (100%) 
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– The Party Poker Million. Win your seat for the next Party Poker Million at Party Poker. Known worldwide as one of the biggest poker events during the calender year, this is a must for all poker players.Poker Games OfferedTexas Hold’em (Pot limit, no limit and fixed limit) Omaha High, Omaha 8 or better, Seven Card Stud, Stud 8 or better 
Limits and RakeParty Poker offers limits from $0.5/$1 right trough to $30/$60. The rakes for various limits are presented below. 

LimitNumber of playersPot sizeRake
$0.50/$1.002-10$5$0.50
and $1/$22-10$20$1.00
$2/$42-3$20$1.00
thru4-5$20$1.00
$10/$206-10$40$2.00
$10/$206-10$20$1.00
$10/$206-10$40$2.00
$10/$206-10$60$3.00
$15/$302-3$40$1.00
thru4-5$40$1.00
$30/$606-10$70$2.00
$30/$606-10$40$1.00
$30/$606-10$70$2.00
$30/$606-10$100$3.00

The rake at this room is pretty stock standard. This online poker room did offer better value for the lower limit games, but is now the standard 5 per cent, capped at $3 for the medium limit games. For the lower limit games a max of $1 for $1/$2 games and 50 cents for $0.5/$1 games is taken out of the pot. However, this is only taken if the pot reaches $20 and $5 respectively, which is not a bad deal. For higher limit games Party Poker offers pretty good value with significantly less than 5 per cent taken out of each pot.Player TrafficParty Poker is the largest poker room on the internet, there is no waiting around for games to begin, the sheer volume of player traffic means there is always someone willing to take a seat at almost every level and for every poker variation. With heavily funded advertisement campaigns and thousands of affiliates across the web, Party continues to keep a strangle hold on a large percentage of the online poker market.PlayabilityThere are plenty of options at Party Poker to help make your playing environment suit your taste, you can remove the icon images if you prefer, add notes on players for future reference as well as view general table stats such as average pot sizes. As you would expect from a large poker room, there are many stake levels available for players to choose from, making Party an excellent choice for the beginner online poker player. 

Deposit options

There are many funding options available at Party Poker, players can choose from the following: 

Visa; MasterCard; eChecks; FPS epassport; Global Calling Card; NETeller; FirePay; Citadel; Wire Transfer; Inter-Account Transfers. 
Software and Extra Features

Software

Party Poker have developed their software to become an industry leader over the years. Even with up to 70,000 players online at peak periods, the software performs perfectly. Both lobby and tables are easy on the eye and quite simple to navigate. iGlobalMedia supply the software for Party Poker, one of the leaders in online gaming since 1997. 

Extra Features

Party Points – During real money play at Party Poker, players can accumulate points for special bonuses such as: entry into freerolls, priority support answering and Patry Poker merchandise. The more points players collect the better these bonuses become. 

Player Notes – An easy to use, excellent notes facility is in place at Party. 

Buddy List – Keep a look out for players using the Party buddy list, fast and user friendly. 

Hand History Logs – A good way to keep track of your play is to study your hand history. Party provide excellent hand history information in the lobby. 

Create A Private Table – Set the password and the table will be up and running. Great for online friends to meet up and play amongst themselves privately. 

Video/Audio Options – A whole host of options are available for players here. Avatars can be turned on and off as can different sound effects. Customise the poker room the way you want to play it.Customer ServiceNo problems here, an online floor person is available 24 hours a day, although it can take a few minutes to get a response due to the number of players Party handles. Email support is always dealt with swiftly and is a good option is you don’t require urgent assistance.Site SecurityThere have been no reported security issues with Party Poker, player security is very good and the financial stability of the poker room looks very strong.

Poker

Kill Games Rules

It is another variation for Hold’em and Omaha 8/b fans. If you want to spice up the game, try out Kill or Half-Kill versions. Basically, the game stakes increase when someone wins two qualifying hands in a row. These are very popular games, but can be a bit confusing so let’s take a look at how this all works. 

To Kill or Not To Kill
To play it successfully, you need to understand what a ‘kill’ is and why it happens. The ‘kill’ is a two-step process. First, someone has to win a pot outright (they take all the money – no split pots or side pots). And the total amount of the pot (before rake is taken) must be equal to or greater than 5 times the big blind for the game. For example, in a $2/$4 game the big blind is $2 so the pot would have to be at least $10 (5 x $2 = $10) for it to qualify. If this happens, the winning player gets a button in front of his or her position. This is the ‘partial kill’ button. To receive a ‘partial kill’ button in Omaha 8/b, the player must scoop the pot (in other words win both the high and low hands). Some call it a ‘half-kill’ but that’s just too confusing; we’ll address that later. 

The ‘partial kill’ button signifies that if this player wins the next hand we might have a Kill game and the stakes will go up! But for that to happen the player must win the pot outright, and the amount must be at least 5 times the big blind, just like they did before to get the partial kill button. If this happens we have a Kill game and the stakes go up. So hang on! 

Let’s stick with the example from above. It’s a $2/$4 game and you just won your second qualifying pot. The small blind posts $1, the big blind posts $2, and you – as the kill blind player – post $4. Because you already have $4 posted, the minimum call amount is now $4. Even if you are the small blind or big blind, you still post $4 and the other players must at least call $4 to stay in. It’s important to know that you act in turn, as in any other game (some cardrooms make the Kill blind the last to act). The rest of the hand plays as a $4/$8 game. This continues until the player with the Kill button does NOT win the entire qualifying pot. When the Kill game is not in effect, the stakes revert back to their regular levels. And, if no one has the partial kill button, it resides in the middle of the table. 

Half-kill Equals Little Kill?
UltimateBet offers ‘Half-Kill’ games as well. They play exactly like Kill games, but the stakes don’t increase a full amount; they increase a half amount instead. We know, it’s so obvious! So a $2/$4 game plays as a $3/$6 game when the ‘Kill’ is active. And that’s why we use the term ‘partial kill’ to describe the first step, instead of ‘half-kill’. Some also use the phrase ‘first leg’ to refer to this. We offer a ‘Half-Kill’ game in Hold’em as well as Omaha 8/b. 

Regardless of what you call it, these games add an additional level of fun and excitement to your favorite games. Try them out!

Poker

Double Flop Hold’em Rules

Double Flop Hold’em plays like regular Texas Hold’em, but with additional community cards. 

FLOP, FLOP?
But it’s not just the flop; it’s the turn and river cards too! That’s right, twice the normal amount of community cards to build your hand! When the flop is dealt there are six cards – three for the upper board and three for the lower board. After that, the turn cards are dealt, one for the upper board, and one for the lower board. Then the river cards, one for the… you get the idea. 

HOW MANY MAY I USE?
Just like in Hold’em, you make your best hand of five cards from the seven available (your two pocket cards plus the five cards of the board – upper OR lower). Our Double Flop game uses only one 52-card deck, so use that to your advantage. Knowing what isn’t in another player’s hand is very valuable. Your King high flush looks pretty good when the Ace is on the other board with a bunch of suits that don’t match! (Technically, one of the cards would have to match the Ace’s suit, but we’re just saying…)! 

SO MANY CHOICES!
You can use one row and one row only to make your hand. Your choice – upper row or lower row – doesn’t need to be declared, and can change throughout the hand. For instance, you have A, K in the pocket. The upper flop is 3, A, K while the lower flop is J, 8, 10. Congratulations! You have two pair. The turn cards are dealt as 8 (upper) and Q (lower). 

DOUBLE THE WINNING!
A winner will be chosen from the best hand for both the upper row and the lower row. You may have the best hand for each row and scoop the pot, but more likely you’ll be sharing with someone else at the table.

Ace to Five Triple Draw
Ace to five triple draw plays exactly like deuce to seven triple draw expect that hands are ranked differently. Just as in Deuce to Seven, you are trying to make a low hand but unlike in Deuce to Seven, in Ace to Five straights and flushes do not count against you and Aces play for low. This means that the best possible hand you can have is A2345 with flushes being irrelevant to the rank of the hand. In Ace to Five, A2345 is called a wheel. A2346 is the next best hand and is called Number 2 or a 6-4. The next best hand is A2356 and so on. 23456 is the worst possible 6-low and the fact that it is a straight does not count against you. 

Other than the ranking of the hands, the game play is identical to deuce to seven so please refer to the game rules for deuce to seven to understand the how betting and drawing works in this game.

Poker

Poker Night in America: Season 4, Episode 21

– [Host] From Choctaw Resort in Durant, Oklahoma, this, is ‘Poker Night In America’. (upbeat music) Welcome to ‘Poker Night In America. I’m Chris Hanson, along with Joe Stapleton, we are at Choctaw Resort, in Durant Oklahoma. – Coming up on today’s show, a somehow less funny version of Gallagher is at the table. And he managed to get under Phil Hellmuth’s skin, so unlike the actual Gallagher, it’s entertaining.

– [Hanson] Day One here at Choctaw, these are the buy-ins, Phil Hellmuth, his usual short buy. Brandon Cantu, making his debut on ‘Poker Night In America’. It’s good to see “Any-Two-Cantu” joining us.

And don’t forget BJ Imejjane, a person who’s entire last name looks like a typo. – What’d you say earlier? I was talking over the top of you.

You told me to shutup- – And then you did it to me- – You told me to shutup right? -Yeah. -Alright. – Get the popcorn! – Just wanna get that on record.

– Oh boy. – If you wanna start whining I brought some Kleenex for you okay. – I bet you’re a really classy guy. – I am so classy. – Mhmm I can tell. I can tell.

– [Hanson] Brandon Cantu makes it 150. – You know what you kinda remind me of Lyin’ Ted Cruz you know? You need to hold up the poker book and then play your hand’s different to what you say you’re s’posed to. – Well I haven’t been called a liar in 30 years. You’re showing a lot of class here. Throw me those tissues.

I need to cry, bring ’em over. Show everybody, you threw me tissues, told me to cry, called me a liar- – I thought you had allergies. – Can you finish all your insults at once, or do I have to wait? – I got plenty of ’em.

– Really? You called me a liar, whiner, threw me tissues. You’re a class act.

Told me to shutup. If I quit this show early at least we’ll know cause of you. – Oh don’t do that man. – Why not? I don’t have to be here. I’m just messin’ around, I don’t care.

– Oh boy. – You don’t have to run off like a little baby either, I mean stick around and play. – Called me a baby. Let’s get the insult meter up. You gotta have a panel up there, insults, are you just gonna rotate in strange guys I’ve never heard of before? (laughter) I mean what do you do?

You give ’em, here’s the 10 insults I want at Phil, Bink-Bink-Bink-Bink he ran off five insults in one hand. He doesn’t know how bad he’s gonna look on national television when this comes out. He’s gonna be there, and his wife’s gonna say “What were you doing? You don’t act that way at home”. -Yeah, he probably does act that way at home. He’s gonna be like “Oh I’m so embarrassed honey, I can’t believe the whole world’s watching me make fun of Phil.

– How much whining you gonna do man? [Hanson] and now a bottle. – But now he threw me a bottle, that’s insult number six. Can you get- Man, I want a panel okay, this is what I want for the viewers at home, there’s a panel of the Phil insults, beep beep beep beep beep beep beep beep.

Let’s see how many he can fill, like the whole television with insults. – Hey Phil, Phil. Don’t take it personal. – [Stapleton] Alright either this guy came prepared for these gags or he’s just into some really weird stuff. – Seven.

You got any more insults? Let’s get ’em all out now. [Cantu] I’m not folding but I’m thinking. Alright I’m all in.

– [Dealer] All in. – [Phillips] All in and a call. Wow, what a flop. [Stapleton] Up and down straight flush draw and top pair versus top and bottom pair. – So how many outs does Phil have to get to the ten binks before the end of this hand?

– Somehow Cate Hall missed all of her outs. – [Multiple People] Ohhhh! – Jinxed it!

– Saved by the bell. [Stapleton] This hand ends in a chop. – [Cantu] Oh those are some big hands. Jeez. -Unlike Donald Trump’s hands which are very tiny.

– What’s the percentage there Phil, you always coach me on percentages. Cate you’re a Yale person, what’s the percentage on that? [Stapleton] My cousin went to Yale. His name was Jeremiah Johnson.

– But there’s no room to put 51 per cent on the screen ‘cos right now it’s full of insults. – There’s more hilarious prop jokes, or insults to Phil, after the break. – For more from Poker Night, visit pokernight.com or find us on Twitch, Facebook, Twitter or Youtube, where you can see complete episodes and unedited live streams. – Okay when I insult you, you take my chips away, that’ll kind of make us even right? – I feel like that might be the case.

Now see I like that move. – Yeah, I agree. – [Phil] You can pull that out on me, I don’t mind. -Okay. – So you and I are kind of best friends now, huh? – I have fights with a lot of people, but at the end of the day almost everybody I get along with.

Just ‘cos I start off on the wrong foot with somebody doesn’t mean I don’t get along with them. – [Hanson] It’s good to know that even though Jim Carroll and Phil Hellmuth got started on the wrong foot, it’s seems like calmer heads- – I’m sure that this could go South again in a heartbeat. – I’ll play this one blind.

– [Stapleton] What did this guy bring a trunk full of props? Carrot-top meet cauliflower-top. If I can make it 2k on the turn, I can go for all the chips.

I don’t think you can fold aces. – You gotta tell me when it’s my turn. – I’ll help describe the action for you, 200 from Dennis. – 200 from Dennis.

– 150, it’s on Cate. She calls. [Hanson] We can take the rest of the hand off, Phil’s got it, Stapes. – It’s on me? Are these greens or blacks?

– Black. – [Stapleton] I didn’t know it was possible to be less funnier than carrot-top but Jim Carroll-top is giving him a good run. – [Phil] Should I keep the running commentary going? – Yeah keep it going, I gotta know what’s going on man, can’t see nothing.

– Somehow he’s got Ace, Queen. – Dennis is thinking about raising. – It’s on Todd.

– Why is Todd in that hand? – I’m not. – He folds just now. – Yay. – [Hanson] Like 15 minutes ago, Phil Hellmuth wanted to rip Jim Carroll’s head off.

Now he’s helping him cross the street. – [Hanson] Is that an eye pillow, Stapes, that Carroll is wearing, what is that? – I knew that was comin’. – 1400 total.

– What?! – [Stapleton] I’m just wondering how much of his S&M kit he brought with him on this trip. – What color are these?

– Green. – Not very good. I’m lookin’. (laughter) – I don’t blame you. (laughter) – I wish I could wear a blindfold watching this guy play.

– Okay, how many chips you got down there Dennis? – I think most people for this show think ear muffs would be more appropriate. (laughter) – That includes the two of us. – Alright you go first. – [Stapleton] Carroll somehow hits top pair despite the fact that he was dominated before the flop.

– 22? – Not even a pot sized bet. – Okay so that means you limped originally and then you re-raised ‘cos I did a donkey 400.

Now you’re throwin’ 22 out there. – [Stapleton] He’s not even as good an actor as Carrot-top- Chris, I know you love Chairman of the Board -you don’t have a set or you wouldn’t have done that. – Never saw it. – You’re missing out.

– [Stapleton] If you watch it, Carrot-top pays you. – I raise. – [Hanson] Back to Dennis Phillips. – 2500 more? – [Stapleton] I think at this point Dennis is pretty clear that he doesn’t have the best hand. He’s got out to the nuts but, not a very good shot at hitting it.

– Uh oh here comes something else. – Phillip, Dennis. Hand lose.

– Yoda. – Over-shot. – This guy has white magic.

He’ll read your mind. – Fold you must. – Folks out there, white magic. Yoda reads minds That’s what white magic is. – [Stapleton] Put me down, violated I feel.

– Yoda, is Dennis gonna lose this hand? – I’m too afraid to actually try a Yoda impression, do you have one? [Hanson] (Yoda voice) Ooohh.. [Stapleton] (laughs) (Yoda voice) Bullets you dodge can. – Okay that’s why I didn’t attempt it. – Yeah it’s not very good.

[Stapleton] (Yoda voice) Hmmm…fold you must. – See now that’s good. – Like you’re a pro, and if you fold and I’m bluffing, it’s gonna be on TV, you’re gonna look like a donkey.

But if you call and I got the better hand, you’re gonna look like a donkey. So the only move you have really is to go all in, and hope that I get scared off and throw my hand away. – That’s one option.

– There’s no way you can come out lookin’ good in this. You know I gotcha. – [Hanson] Dennis Phillips just fold already – Yeah maybe I’ll have to get lucky then. – [Hanson] I wanna see what else Jim Carroll has in his bag. – I call.

– [Stapleton] Woah he talked him into it. Dennis Phillips calling the raise, with just 16 percent equity. -I check Probably thinks both his overs are good, we know they’re not. – What’d you write in your book about this Phil?

What am I supposed to do here? I’ll check it. – [Stapleton] That Diamond and a Jack is a bit of a scare card, goes check-check. – No I check.

– You’re checking? – [Stapleton] Yep, woke up with Ace, Queen in the dark. – I did beat the Aces. – You did kill the Aces off.

– But I saved you like 3K by playing it. – I am sorry you didn’t get all the good chips, you should’ve held that hand. You played it- You played it wrong against an amateur. – Alright I’ll fall for it and open it.

– Just a sympathy card is all it is. – This should be good. “In deepest sympathy, please accept my deepest regards for the loss of your chips for not raising. Wishing you peace at this time of sorrow.” But then there’s a big thing written “not”. What is this.

– [Stapleton] Wow, the world’s most elaborate “not” joke. – What’s the “not”? [Stapleton] Psyche!

It’s a sympathy card, I was supposed to win 3K more of his chips, you know. – [Stapleton] That’s hilarious. Not! – I get a lot of gifts when I’m here.

– [Stapleton] I’m sure the next card he has will say “My wife”. You started a little hardcore but it’s easy to warm up to you. Well… – [Stapleton] You know, I’m gonna try to make it with Jim Carroll now. – Okay say your apologies. [Stapleton] I’m…

But I do enjoy the game. – Gonna try harder with you. Your very advanced in the dark – [Hanson] You called him Cauliflower-top, you called him Carroll-top… Uh-huh. Come on. I mean those could be compliments really. – Damn you haven’t played a hand in so long I didn’t even know you were here.

How much is that? Eight hundred and? – 825 total. I call Ahhhhgh. Ahhgh – Okay I won’t needle you anymore, it’s fine.

– Now if I suck out on you, you don’t tilt on me, okay Phil’s been nice, he hadn’t tilted. – [Phil] I’ve tilted. – He tilted on his four for a little while. – At the way I played the six, four of diamonds- – [Hanson] Well, heads up with Todd Brunson and Jim Carroll, Carroll flops a set of tens. I do not think Todd’s one who’s gonna give this up too easily.

We already see him firing out. – One, two, three thousand left huh. – That’s it.

-Two thousand. – [Stapleton] I like a raise here, I think this is gonna hit a large part of Todd’s range. – I’m gonna raise it 1200 – [Stapleton] Looks like Jim agrees with me. – Gave you a little bit of dignity, you can fold.

And still feel good. – Appreciate that. – [Gavin Smith] What happened to that golf cart you had, I liked that. – I got it in my garage, you like that? – [Phil] Is it done?

That’s a beautiful golf cart, I love that. – I’ll take this one, you take the next five. -So, it broke down? -We have five acres.

– [Stapleton] Todd’s gettin’ a pretty good price on a call. – [Hellmuth] Is it broke down or still works? – Ah no it works. – [Stapleton] Assuming that his overs and gut shot are both live, we know the overs are no good.

– They are like the fastest things I’ve ever ridden in. [Brunson] I call. – [Hanson] Wow.

Brunson’s just shipping it all in. Decides he wants to see a turn and river. He’s drawing pretty thin. Very thin now.

– Nooo! – [Hanson] Oh my. – You suck out donkey. (laughter) – God there’s no way you could beat me with skills, so you had to suck out like a donkey. – What the hell were you thinking?

– Yeah there’s no way Todd Brunson could beat you with skill. (muffled whining) I think that was a wonderful play Mr Brunson. Thanks, Gavin. – I experience I’m one of the luckiest guys in the world playing cards and one of the most unlucky guys in the world, like when Brunson sucked out on me. – He’s calling everybody down with anything.

That one part I won where I made a straight against him, he had a set. I had a gut shot. Looked bad, but, he could’ve had a lot of hands, he could’ve had an open and straight either direction. – I’ve been playing that image all day long. I’m losing, so you know, and I let some people run over me and that kind of stuff.

And I’m right in his head, he does exactly what I wanna do. Boom, and he sucks out a King. – I mean it looked bad when he turned over his set obviously but that was the very very top end of his range so, if it was the bottom end of his range I would’ve looked like a genius, it’s just, that’s how poker works sometimes. – Coming up on ‘Poker Night in America’ we are gonna cover all of our bases and include a few more colors of magic. C’mon people, it’s 2016. – Feel like we should play this one just the two of us.

– Yah. – I raise to get rid of her and keep you in. If I, win a big pot with Aces, I apologize.

– Welcome back to Poker Night in America’ from the Choctaw Resort. Cash action, is back under way. – C’mon. – He pressed the button. – He had four outs the entire time.

– No not really. – If Todd books five days in a row in a mixed game, he doesn’t lose, you know? Unless he’s playing like that. Were you playing like that?

– Yeah. (laughter) – That’s the way to shut him down. – Sometimes I do that too, sometimes I play bad.

– Maybe we’re just playing too small for Todd, you know? – Could be yeah. Is that what it is? – [Stapleton] Todd has played in some of the biggest cash games in history. I’m doing it. [Dealer] Raise [Hellmuth] Call Kate Hall makes it 650 with Ace Queen.

– I want the donkey to look at himself right now. – What does it mean when I just snapped it in there? – I dunno. – It means you’re trying to keep me in this damn thing.

– I’d assume it means different things at different times. – Here it looks good though. 650 total? – [Stapleton] Up against their two actual hands, Dennis isn’t doing too badly. – If I can make full house over full house I think this time I’m gonna get paid. – You might, you might, yeah.

[Dealer] Three players – [Stapleton] Cate Hall started with the best hand, flops the best hand. And Phil’s caught his nine. So he may lose a little here. Maybe we’ll see one his classic white magic folds. – [Carroll] Why couldn’t you turn over a set of Jacks, I would’ve felt a lot better.

– Make it 18. [Dealer] Raise to 18 – [Stapleton] Nope. That should get rid of Dennis Phillips and so now back to Cate Hall.

I think the move here for Cate is to smooth call even though I can see the hold cards. It’s just so unlikely that Phil has a Queen and when he does, he’s probably not gonna raise it. So you don’t wanna chase him out of this pot. Either way you look strong there. – Wow, thought I had the stone cold nuts, now I have to wonder.

Now I’m confused. – How does a Full House sound? That one scared me – [Stapleton] Sounds much better than a bad two-pair. Cate deciding she can’t get three full streets so, takes the turn off.

– Wow this is really cold. – [Stapleton] One for her value here on the river. – 32? [Dealer] 32.

– Did you really get that lucky? You probably wouldn’t bet Kings, Kings are no good. You probably wouldn’t bet Jacks, I can beat those too. You’re a tournament player so you love to bluff. My instincts say I’m supposed to put it in.

You’re not bad enough to call a raise with Ace, King on the flop are you? Maybe. Tournament players do weird things. – [Stapleton] Needle her with the tournament player jab.

– Why would you bluff? Logic’s messing me up here. I call. – [Stapleton] Sorry Phil.

– I would’ve called as well Phil. – Yeah. -I would have.

– She played it well. – [Phil] Well she’s a tournament player so I know- – [Cate] I’m not a tournament player. – [Phil] You play this like a tournament player I think. – [Stapleton] I’m surprised Phil didn’t just say, “Nice hand Cate Hall.. …Not!” – Okay who wants a piece of me, here we go.

– Gut shot. – Uh oh, not Todd. – Back on with the war Dennis. Okay. (bleep) That’s what you get for throwing that war on.

– Okay I haven’t looked, but I’m gonna try to suck out on you this time alright? – [Stapleton] This is going to take a major suck out to run down Aces with Ace, Jack. I’d rather have nine-seven. – I will check before the cards come out, how ’bout that? I’ll set up your own death here.

– [Stapleton] Six, seven, eight, nine, that’s something right? That is a small straight if you’re playing Yatzzi. But it’s open-ended if you’re playing poker. Who says there’s no women in poker? Check out the rail. – [Phil] You sold it well though.

– [Cate] Thank you. – [Phil] I learnt a lot though, that’s what always happens to me. – [Stapleton] Chris can you handle this while I go down there, I wanna make sure she doesn’t get away. – [Phil] In the old days it was better because, against all the great players, I’d play with them, I’d learn and I got to play with them all the time. – [Hanson] Brunson raises to 625.

[Stapleton] If I’m Cantu, I kind of like the fact that Todd put more money into this pot. I think that’s an auto call, he’s probably just taking his time so it doesn’t look like a draw. [Stapleton] Hello! No waiting on the turn, look at that. Cantu makes his straight. It’s a fairly disguised straight.

– 650. – [Stapleton] I don’t think Todd can really assume this five undid him. But when Brandon gets raised on the flop and then still fires, small on the turn, that’s gotta look kinda suspicious.

It’s like he’s just asking to get raised again. Yeah Todd knows something’s up. -I’m all in. So Todd calls, Brandon ships it dark. Best card for him on the river would’ve been an Ace. I just don’t know, if Brandon makes that same move with a hand that Aces is beating now.

Like would he do it with just a seven? Would he do it with Ace, Queen? I think Todd might find a way to get away from this. Oh he calls.

– Straight? – Yep. – [Stapleton] Aces cracked. When we come back we’ll find out who’s up at Choctaw next. – Married 26 years.

– Some how managed to be married 26 years and be a poker player. – That’s not an easy feat I can tell you right now. – It means you have to win. – Winning is definitely helpful. – Five hundred.

You both missed the flop, didn’t you? You’re gonna call hoping you can suck out against me anyway. – Yup, that’s it exactly. – [Hanson] Closed captioning is brought to you as a public service by Poker Night In America. – [Hanson] We will finish up Day One next time on ‘Poker Night In America’. No real big winners, although Cate Hall is the leader at the halfway point.

She’s up eight thousand dollars. Jim Carroll and Phil Hellmuth spent so much time going at it, I didn’t even have time to say anything dumb about Cate Hall, so I’m declaring myself the winner. Hellmuth is in the plus column for a change, but can he stay there? We’ll continue Day One next time. – Stay alive Phil, I will find you.

– For more from ‘Poker Night In America’ visit pokernight.com or, hook up with us on Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and Twitch, for up to date information, full episodes and un-edited live streams. For Joe Stapleton, I’m Chris Hanson, see you next time, here on ‘Poker Night In America’. – You’re gonna keep whining, I got some pampers for you. – I think I need these right now.